Before They Were Legends–The Industry’s Top Horses

When you’re watching greatness like Peyton Manning last night (yes, I am a Colts fan, but also a Manning fan), or even some of the top horses competing at the All American Quarter Horse Congress this month, it’s hard to imagine that at one point, everyone had to start somewhere. Peyton had to start in the pee-wee football leagues. Harley D Zip had to start out with a trainer to figure out the right buttons.

Here are a few quotes and tidbits about some of the horse industry’s top performers and how they were before they were legends:

  • Harley D Zip “I hobbled him; I rode him in orchards and in cow pens, and I treated him like a horse and wore him down,” trainer Doug Pratt remembers. “Jason Martin still had his hands full when he got him, but as he got to be seven, eight, and nine, he got better. But even when he was six or seven, if you didn’t longe him just right, he’d have a hump in his back and you’d have to grit through it.”
  • RL Best Of Sudden “When we first saw him we knew he was special, truly, he just had such a presence he looked like a special one,” says Candy Parrish. “Then, when we saw him lope around under saddle with just a handful of rides, we had no doubt he was a great one. Bo was exceptionally easy to train. He was so naturally gifted that Bret just had to show him what to do and it was easy for him.”
  • Allocate Your Assets When Brian Isbell and partner Kevin Garcia first saw Allocate Your Assets as a long yearling in 2001, it was all they could do to keep calm—they knew he was going to be something. “I knew right then and there, he was going to be my once-in-a-lifetime horse,” recalls multiple World Champion trainer, Isbell.
  • RPL My Te Cheerful RPL My Te Cheerful’s first show wasn’t until late into his two year-old year with Monte Horn. His breeder, Bobbie and Henry Atkinson, felt that the late-blooming son of My Te Telusive needed some time to just grow and be a horse, so he spent many days out to pasture, with some light work here and there with the Atkinson’s farm manager, Michael Ochetto.
  • John Simon “There was never a question the second I saw him move that he would turn into something special,” says Tim Gillespie, who said he was the best minded stallion he has ever trained. “He was very easy to finish out and was a true gentleman. He never had any quirks or gave us any trouble.”
Harley D Zip, ridden by then-owner Brian Ale, and trainer Doug Pratt at the 1998 Tom Powers. Photo courtesy Doug Pratt

Harley D Zip, ridden by then-owner Brian Ale, and trainer Doug Pratt at the 1998 Tom Powers. Photo courtesy Doug Pratt

 

Read more about these legends and their younger years on GoHorseShow.com: Before They Were Legends: A Look Back at their Younger Years

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Joaquin Delon Brings Mexican Flavor to Halter Horses

Horses are an international language. I remember when I was a student ambassador for People to People and traveled to Italy, Austria, and Hungry when I was in grade school. My homestay in Gutau, Austria, lived on a farm and had Haflingers. I was so excited to be able to be around horses, even if for just a few days, because I was extremely homesick. Our mutual love of horses, no matter the breed, helped me bond with Ava and her family much easier than I expected.

Enter Joaquin Delón, a young man who grew up in Mexico and started dreaming about horses as a young kid. Even when his parents sent him to soccer camp, he yearned to run over to the neighboring pastures to pet the horses more than he wanted to score goals. After meeting, and working with, World Champion halter trainers Ted Turner and Wayne Halvorson, he’s moved to the U.S. and has already been pretty successful. Here is my feature on him from the March/April 2013 Equine Chronicle:

 

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Joaquin Delón: Bringing Enthusiasm for the Halter Horse Across the Border (full PDF)